Cee’s Black & White Challenge: 50 Years or Older

An old Raggy Ann Doll and vintage camera.  Found in an Antique Clock Museum in Salem, Oregon.
An old Raggedy Ann Doll and vintage camera. Found in an Antique Clock Museum in Salem, Oregon.

I sincerely hope you had a lot of fun with our last topic Back of Things.  I know I adored seeing all your photos and creative ways of displaying them.  Today’s topic is 50 yeas or Older.   I thought about adding a photo of me since I’m over 50, but being the introvert I am, it was easy to resist.  Have fun and use your creativity!  I have examples at the bottom on this post if you would like some ideas.

Upcoming Topics

  • Man-Made Things
  • Found in Nature
  • Big Subjects
  • Open Topic
  • Small Subjects
  • Food
  • Seating

Remember that Cee’s Black and White Challenge and Cee’s Which Way Challenge will run every other week.

When to Use Black and White

You are more likely going to get a higher quality black and white photo when there is a lot of color contrast or texture contrast.  The contrast will give you more depth when using black and white.

With the age of modern computer software, its fairly easy to see if your photograph will work in black and white or not.  I  use Aperture 3 (Mac software only) to do my post-processing.  I will try and give you some tips and tricks on black and white and various built-in filters.  I won’t tell you percentages, because that is going to vary from software to software.  Then of course you can always play with the percentages to get the image you want.  I usually find the one that fits the closest to what I want and then play with the sliders and percentages to get it perfect.

If you adore challenges as much as I do, please check out WordPress’s Blog Event Listing for other challenges.

How It Works?

This black and white challenge is topic related.  For a list of upcoming topics, please see the list at the bottom of this page.

Be creative and challenge yourself.  Look for contrast or highly textured subjects to shoot.

Hopefully you will find your creative eye will be expanded.

Please do not use sepia tones (brown).

ENJOY and have FUN.

Create a Cee’s Black & White Challenge Post

  1. Then add a link to your blog in my comment box.
  2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos and post, title your blog post “Cee’s Black & White Challenge” tag.
  3. Remember to Follow My Blog to get your weekly reminders.

I usually will respond to your entry on your blog, rather than on my page.

Cee’s Black & White Challenge Badge

082713 b&w banner (1)
Save the button to your computer and upload from there.
Still have questions? Please contact me.

I hope you ENJOY what I chosen for this week!  These photos were all taken with my Nikon D80 with my 18-200 VR lens handheld.

Old carpenter's tools from the late 1800's.  Photo taken at Aurora Colony Museum in Aurora, Oregon.
Old carpenter’s tools from the late 1800’s. Photo taken at Aurora Colony Museum in Aurora, Oregon.
Vintage Packard Hood Ornament, probably from the late 1920 to mid 1930s.
Vintage Packard hood ornament, probably from the late 1920 to mid 1930s.
Old Water Wheel.  Although the house has had electrical update.  Found at a local nursery on the outskirts of Canby, Oregon.
Old Water Wheel. Although the house has had electrical update. Found at a local nursery on the outskirts of Canby, Oregon.

 

Qi (energy) hugs,

Cee

Check my new Three’s Cooking blog, learning to cook from the heart.   If you ever want electronic copies of my photographs, please contact me.  Sites where I have my photography for sale.

65 Comments

  1. I had to think about this. I have a lot of old stuff … dolls, pottery, me, my husband … But what do shoot in black and what??

    Pots.I went with the medium sized Han pot, a perennial fave. Never tried it in B&W before and wasn’t sure how well it would show. Not too bad. You can see the structure better than in color, but the over all effect is quite different.

    I would have added this link last night until I realized I have NO idea how to copy and paste a link using my Windows 8 tablet. No mouse. How? So better late than never — now that I’m at a real computer — let me introduce you to one of the oldest (but not THE oldest) piece in my pottery collection, the Han Dynasty pot. Probably used to store rice or some other dried food. These pots were the first mass-produced household item in history. The Tupperware of their time. But I like it rather better than plastic 🙂

    http://teepee12.com/2014/02/13/han-dynasty-pot-206-bc-220-ad/

    Like

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