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Tips – Black and White Floral Photography

This post completes my 5 part series on Flower Photography.

I hope you enjoy this series for flowers. If you want to check out other Tips from Cee.

This tip will be all about flowers and switching them to black and white. There will be two parts to this tip. The first part will discuss this question: Can all flowers or fields of flowers work well in black and white? The second part will be a pictorial on what type of flowers or fields work in black and white.

Can all flowers or fields of flowers work well in black and white?

If the I’m asking the question, you can assume the answer to this question is no. I’ll show you some examples on what type of flowers for fields don’t work well in black and white and tell you why they don’t look good.

In the photos below., the soft colored rhododendron looks good in color. Although in black and white the subtle pink gets washed out. There isn’t enough texture in the flower itself, to make a statement in black and white.

In the example below of a bright yellow rose, the color just gets washed out in black and white. The black and white to me is flat. The subtle lines in the rose aren’t dramatic enough to really pull in the texture to make a statement.

In the tulip field below, the color really shows off the sky and different colors of the tulips. In the black and white the photo isn’t nearly as dramatic. The sky gets lost and the mixed colors of the tulips don’t really pop.

In summary, here is a list of things you need in a floral photo to make it work well in black and white.

  • Strong contrast
  • Different areas with specific colors
  • Distinguished Lines
  • Repeated patterns
  • Different textures
  • Shadows

What type of flowers or fields work in black and white?

Here are some strong shadows on a lily that works well to show contrast.

There are strong textures and patterns with the petals in this daisy.

In this tulip, there are some strong color contrasts.

In this lotus flower, there are some strong lines and patterns.

In this tulip field, there are strong colors in the rows and lines in the trees.

I’ve gathered a list of challenges and their hosts.  So if you know a challenge host, please direct them to my blog.  Feel free to contact me anytime.  I hope everyone will be able to use my lists.

Qi (energy) hugs

Cee

24 replies »

  1. When I try out black & white on flowers, I usually really really really prefer the colourful shot. It just seems to be unnatural to rob them of exactly that what makes them so attractive in the first place. I get the structure stuff etc. but it is self-explanatory why I like the daisy shot best of your examples.

    Like

    • I don’t do a lot of flowers in black and white. I think that is why I’m so picky with myself on which flowers I turn to bw. Thanks for commenting. The daisy did turn out well. 😀 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Brilliant series with examples. The comparison makes one understand the differences easily. One question though – is “Tips on Various Angles for Flowers” of this series still in making? The link redirects to the main page, so asked.

    Liked by 1 person

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